Leaderboard Ad

Look for Opioid Alternatives After Common Operations

Specialty-Specific Clinical Practice Guideline: Opioid Prescribing for Analgesia After Common Otolaryngology Operations

On-Demand Content: Comprehensive Otolaryngology Track

 

Samantha Anne, MD

Pain after surgery is to be expected—but that doesn’t mean an opioid prescription should be.

Provided to AAO-HNSF 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting & OTO Experience attendees in the convenient format of on-demand content, “Specialty-Specific Clinical Practice Guideline: Opioid Prescribing for Analgesia After Common Otolaryngology Operations” will address the over-prescription of opioids by surgeons.

“Surgeons are a group of physicians that are the second highest prescribers of opioids; only pain medicine specialists prescribe more than us,” said Samantha Anne, MD, Chair of the AAO-HNSF Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) Development Group for the soon to be published CPG: Opioid Prescribing for Analgesia After Common Otolaryngology Operations.

Dr. Anne highlighted several otolaryngology procedures that are typically determined to involve low amounts of pain and therefore don’t necessarily require a significant number of opioids. These include:

  • Parathyroidectomy
  • Thyroidectomy
  • Microdirect laryngoscopy
  • Otologic surgeries

“The CPG focuses on judicious use of opioids and suggests alternative treatment regimens, but also focuses on patient counseling and identifying patient and procedure-related factors that can influence a treatment plan,” said Dr. Anne. “Many times opioids are prescribed in large numbers for these types of cases, and it’s unnecessary if appropriate multimodal analgesia is used.”

The information that is presented during this session that is specific to the contents of the proposed CPG is embargoed until official publication in Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery.

Top